SAN_6204.jpg

Our Farms

SOURCING OF OUR COFFEE

WE SOURCE OUR COFFEE BEANS FROM SUPPLIERS AROUND THE WORLD TO ENSURE THAT WE CAN SERVE OUR GUESTS THE BEST COFFEE POSSIBLE WHILE ALSO SUPPORTING FARMERS USING SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION METHODS AND SUPPORTING THEIR OWN LOCAL COMMUNITIES

BRAZIL - OBERON

The history of Jose Carlos Grossi’s family with coffee cultivation dates back another century and three generations. Life in coffee-growing begins with Jose Carlos Grossi’s grandfather, who migrated from Italy to Brazil, Antonio Gross, in 1879, to work in coffee plantations in Sap Paulo. In 1950, Matheus Grossi, father of Jose Carlos, acquired a property in the north of Parana, where he followed the dream. The family tradition led Jose Carlos to graduate as an Agronomist and to form his first coffee plantation. It was the beginning of the Grossi Group.

COLUMBIA - FINCA PALMICHAL

Finca Palmichal is high on the western side of the Central Andes mountain range, near the municipality of Genova, in the department of Quindio. This region went though violent and difficult times during the peak of the guerrilla expansion in the country. Now, after the negotiation between the government and the FARC, there is hope for continuing peace. Producer Atilano Giraldo is the third generation of his family to grow coffee in Quindio, and he grew up working in coffee alongside his father. Gradually, he acquired additional properties, including Finca Palmichal, which is 53 hectares in size and has approximately 350,000 coffee trees.

ETHIOPA - LIMMU KOSSA

Limmu Kossa Estate is a large, family-owned farm located in the Jimma Zone of the Oromia Region in Ethiopia. The farm was established in the year 2000, and currently produces coffee on 356 hectares across two farms, employing around 700 people during harvest. Limmu Kossa is committed to using modern and environmentally responsible farming techniques to produce high-quality coffee. The farm employs an exemplary agroforestry system making use of the shade of original, indigenous forest species.

PAPA NEW GUINEA - BANUM WO PEABERRY

The Bunum Wo Peaberry is grown by coffee producers from the Wahgi Valley in the Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Coffees from the estate go through a careful picking, sorting, fermentation, and drying process before they are finally sorted by hand. The coffees are then meticulously graded, roasted, and cupped by a quality control team.

The estate where this coffee is produced supports a strong social agenda and provides free housing, healthcare, and schooling to the pickers and farmers, who work tirelessly to help produce these coffees.

PERU - CHURUPAMPA

Finca Churupampa is a very progressive coffee farm in Chirinos, Cajamarca, Peru, working on self-sufficiency and sustainability for future generations. The Tocto brothers took over the farm’s operations from their parents several years ago and are transforming it into a model for economically and environmentally sustainable coffee production. In addition to selling coffee from their own farm, the Toctos provide export and marketing services for 215 neighboring farmers. Finca Churupampa has a training center that is open to the entire community, and works with farmers to improve their production practices to break a cycle of poverty that has entrapped farmers in the region for many years.

Churupampa is highly focused on the welfare of both the coffee producers and the environment. They provide farmers with opportunities to improve production practices, are focused on organic farming, and utilize a soil management program which produces fertilizers and compost using a diverse selection of microorganisms gathered from the surrounding forest.

COLUMBIA - DECAF PALMERA

Named for Colombia’s national tree, Palmera is produced on farms in the Huila’s coffee farms are predominantly smallholder owned and over the past 10 years have made concerted efforts to produce specialty coffee that reveals the full character of the region. Palmera decaf begins with Columbia Palmera Supreme beans and is then decaffeinated by Descafecol SA using the Ethyl Acetate (EA) process from sugarcane grown nearby. The EA process gently extracts caffeine from the coffee beans, avoiding the use of excessive heat, to remove more than 97% of caffeine.

 

Huila’s departmental coffee committee, the local connection to the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation, has invested notable resources into training producers in everything from fertilization to roasting. Palmera represents the hard work of many farmers and producing communities.

Join our mailing list

© 2020 Tellus Coffee